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Key Points

  • Xanax®’s generic name is alprazolam.
  • Xanax® slows the central nervous system to cause its effects.
  • Xanax® belongs to the class of benzodiazepines.
  • Each Xanax® pill color represents a different dose.

Xanax® is the brand name for alprazolam, a powerful benzodiazepine. Benzos promote relaxation and are often prescribed to treat anxiety. But Xanax® pills with different colors may have different effects.

What Are White Xanax® Bars?

White Xanax® bars are one of the most common forms of this drug. This pill contains 2 mg of alprazolam and is long and rectangular. It has a brand-name imprint on one side and a number stamped on the other.

There are also thin lines along the pill’s length. Because of their appearance, these pills are called bars, sticks, or planks. Some white Xanax® pills may also be oval, but this is less common. While most white Xanax® bars contain 2 mg of alprazolam, some may only contain 0.25 mg.

This smaller dosage is best for those weaning off a higher dose. It can be dangerous to stop benzodiazepines suddenly. Benzos bind to GABA-A receptors in the brain.[1] When alprazolam binds to these receptors, the CNS (central nervous system) slows down. This causes a sense of relaxation throughout the body and mind.

Taking Xanax® as prescribed should help reduce a person’s anxiety symptoms. They can also treat panic disorders. Xanax® is sometimes used off-label to treat insomnia. All benzos have the potential for dependence, abuse, and addiction. Misusing the medication may increase this risk.

You may start taking it because of your anxiety. But after some time, you may find that you can’t function without it. If you try to stop, you may have rebound effects, such as panic attacks.

It is also possible to develop a tolerance. You’ll need to take higher doses to get the same effect. Higher doses can be dangerous and may lead to an accidental overdose.

Guide To Xanax® Bars

The other colors for Xanax® include blue, purple, peach, pink, yellow, and green. Some of these pills may also have different shapes. These colors and shapes have different dosages. They make it easier to distinguish one dosage from another.

Some Xanax® bars are fake. Fake bars can be dangerous as they can be mixed with harmful ingredients. Purple pills are small and round. They contain 2 mg of alprazolam, the same as the white bars. Doctors may recommend that patients cut these pills to take smaller daily doses.

Green Xanax are 2 or 1 mg. Green Xanax that are 3mg, also known as Hulk Xanax, are black market Xanax that should be avoided. Hulk Xanax can be laced with other dangerous substances such as fentanyl.

Yellow Xanax® is 2 or 1 mg and is rectangular with numbers stamped on the front.

Peach Xanax® is usually oval, and the typical dose is 0.5 mg. These pills are often prescribed for those who have never tried Xanax® before. Starting with a low dose and upping it, if necessary, is a safe approach. This dose is also useful for those weaning off the medication.

Blue Xanax® pills are 1 or 2 mg. They are oval or round. A vertical dent in the middle of each pill makes it easy to split.

Pink Xanax® is usually 0.25mg or 0.5mg. The 3mg variation is sold on black market and is common among those who abuse benzos. The higher dose makes it easier to experience a strong feeling of euphoria when abusing the pills.

Red Xanax® bars are always fake. You may see them sold on the street or dark web. They have different effects than Xanax® and can be very dangerous due to their unregulated ingredients and unknown dose.

How to spot fake xanax bars

How To Spot Fake Xanax® Tablets

Real Xanax® will always be etched with its name brand/numbers on the front of the pill. If the pill is blank, it is fake. The Xanax® print on the pill should be 3D. If it isn’t, it’s a fake. If you get a white Xanax® bar that has a strange shade, you should be suspicious. A light peach color or dark gray, the pill may be fake.

You can also test your Xanax® by putting it in water. Real Xanax® will always dissolve within a few minutes. There are also more obvious fakes, such as red Xanax® bars. Taking fake Xanax® is dangerous because it may be mixed with unknown fillers. Common fillers include cat litter, battery acid, rat poison, talcum powder, and other illicit substances like fentanyl.

Fake Xanax® can cause rashes, nausea, vomiting, headaches, heart palpitations, and sweating. More serious interactions include allergic reactions, seizures, and respiratory depression.

Is Xanax® Addictive?

There were 48 million alprazolam prescriptions provided in 2013 in the United States.[2] This makes it one of the most common prescription medications in the country. While most people use Xanax® as prescribed, many will eventually abuse it. Many teenagers and young adults will abuse the drug to experience euphoria.

Those with substance use disorders may be more likely to abuse this drug. It is also sometimes used to enhance the euphoria of other drugs. All benzos have the potential for abuse and addiction. Benzos are Schedule IV drugs, and according to the DEA, they are not as addictive as opioids and similar drugs, but they can still be dangerous.

Snorting or injecting Xanax® will cause a powerful high. This causes feelings of relaxation and happiness. It is followed by a crash or dysphoria, which makes a person feel ill. This spurs the person to abuse more Xanax®. The more a person chases a Xanax® high, the more tangled they will become in their addiction.

Xanax® Side Effects

The most common side effects are drowsiness, confusion, dizziness, and headaches. Some may experience amnesia, irritability, unusual dreams, and hostility.[3] Some people do not develop any side effects. Others may have minor side effects that go away after a week or two.

Some may have serious side effects. These may include slowed heartbeat, slowed breathing, fainting, and seizures. An overdose is also a concern in those who take high doses. This could lead to respiratory depression, hypoxia, brain damage, and death. Always talk to your doctor if you experience long-lasting side effects from Xanax®.

Risks of Long-Term Xanax® Use

You could experience rebound symptoms when you stop taking Xanax®. This could cause increased anxiety and panic attacks. Some may experience mood changes, depression, increased anxiety, and low libido. Others may feel fatigued all the time. Long-term use with moderate or higher doses may also cause liver damage in some people. Snorting Xanax® can cause lung problems.

Xanax® Addiction Treatment

Detox placement is a great place to start overcoming your addiction to Xanax®. It will help you get the drug out of your system in a safe and supportive environment. Partial care and intensive outpatient programs can help those with severe and long-term addictions. They involve many hours of therapy. These include CBT, family, group, art, and individual therapy.

Treatment for co-occurring disorders will help if you have anxiety, depression, or other mental health issues. Treating your mental health will also help you overcome your addiction. Giving yourself a firm foundation with these programs will give you the strength and wisdom you need to get beyond your addiction.

The Beginning of A New Journey Starts Today

Dependence on Xanax® can be difficult. You may feel that you can’t live a normal life without it. But getting a professional treatment can help you get beyond this problem

Frequently Asked Questions

Below are some of the most frequently asked questions regarding Xanax® .

2 mg is the highest dose per legal pill. 3mg Xanax are usually from the black market. 

Xanax®’s effects will last around 12 hours. If you take a small dose, it may only last half as long. Slow-release options may last longer.

Xanax® affects the CNS, which consists of the brain and spinal cord. It binds to GABA-A receptors to slow the CNS. This produces tranquilizing effects. 

It can be safe to take Xanax® long-term when using it as prescribed. However, it is possible to develop tolerance or dependence. 

[1] George TT, Tripp J. Alprazolam. [Updated 2023 Apr 24]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2023 Jan-. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK538165/ on 2023, June 29.

[2] Ait-Daoud, N., Hamby, A. S., Sharma, S., & Blevins, D. (2018). A Review of Alprazolam Use, Misuse, and Withdrawal. Journal of addiction medicine, 12(1), 4–10. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5846112/ on 2023, June 29. 

[3] Benzodiazepines – dea.gov. (n.d.-a). Retrieved from https://www.dea.gov/sites/default/files/2023-04/Benzodiazepines%202022%20Drug%20Fact%20Sheet_1.pdf on 2023, June 29. 

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